archive.php
Main Content Area
content.php

Canine Bloat

Image may contain: dog and outdoor

Image Credit: Facebook Fan Scott D. & Clyde

Why So Serious?

Canine Bloat
Canine bloat (a.k.a Gastric Dilatation Volvulus or GDV) is an emergency condition that is
initiated within the stomach. Under suboptimal circumstances the stomach can become overly
distended and twist upon itself. This agonizingly painful and rapid event becomes life
threatening within a few hours of onset if intensive emergency treatment is not initiated.
Frequently, cases are fatal even with treatment. No single cause is identifiable but certain dog
breeds do indeed have the deck stacked against them, so to speak. The rapid sequence of
events that occur from GDV are toxic and potentially deadly.

Read More >





content.php

First Aid for Hot Spots

Image result for hot spot on labrador

Image Credit: http://www.petmd.com

First Aid for Hot Spots

Face, neck, hips, and above the tail: What do these areas have in common?  These are the most common locations of the emergency skin condition called moist pyodermatitis, often called ‘hot spots’.  The location of the hot spot can help determine the underlying cause.

Hot spots usually start out small yet grow in size rapidly (within a few hours). Chewing or licking at the sore exacerbates the problem and the sore may quickly become infected.   Like the name suggests, hot spots may feel ‘hot’ or warm and are an extremely painful, itchy, and often oozing area of skin. It is one of a few skin-related emergencies frequently treated by veterinarians. Read More >





content.php

Inside the Canine Brain: Part II

No automatic alt text available.

Inside the Canine Brain: Part II

Part II: Seizure Diagnostics and Lifestyle Management

Seizures can occur due to an extensive list of causes: metabolic imbalances, toxins, brain tumors, infectious diseases, brain trauma and scarring, immune-mediated diseases, stroke and congenital abnormalities (birth defects).  Sometimes, dogs have episodes that look like seizures but are actually collapsing episodes not directly related to the brain. Testing is necessary to narrow down the list of differentials.

Previous health history, as well as the history surrounding the seizure-like event, is always important for correct diagnosis and treatment. Age and breed of the dog are also considered. A routine baseline of data is recommended for any dog exhibiting seizure-like activity. This includes a physical exam, blood work, and urinalysis. Additional testing may be warranted. Read More >





content.php

Inside the Canine Brain: Part I

No automatic alt text available.

Image Credit: Briana Thompson “Dr. B has treated Mose for Seizures.”

Inside the Canine Brain

Part I: Seizures and First Aid

Brains are organs that communicate through pathways involving chemical and electrical signaling. In a healthy brain, this system is very tightly regulated. When the system does not function properly, communication occurs haphazardly and without proper regulation within the brain. Physically, this presents as seizures. Read More >





content.php

Dog Poisoning by Rodenticide

Related image

Dog Poisoning by Rodenticide

Rodenticides: the basics

To kill off invasive pests like rats or mice, people often use rodenticides, commonly known as ‘rat poison’. These poisons, found in homes, farms, building sites, and commercial buildings, also pose a very real threat for our domestic animals who may ingest them accidentally.

If your dog ingests rodent poison (rodenticide), there are a few things your vet will need to know to help your pet:

  1. What time (approximately) did ingestion occur?
  2. What kind of poison (the name brand or the active ingredients list)?
  3. Approximate amount ingested
  4. Body weight of your dog

These facts will determine what treatment options will be most beneficial. Read More >





content.php

Canine Lyme Disease

Adult deer tick.jpg

Image credit: Wikipedia

Canine Lyme Disease

What is Lyme disease?
Lyme disease is a set of clinical symptoms caused by the infectious bacterial organism Borrelia
burgdorferi ( B. burgdorferi). It’s named after the city of Lyme in Connecticut, where the disease
was first identified. Both humans and dogs can get Lyme disease, but the symptoms and
timeline for onset of disease are quite different. People cannot contract Lyme disease directly
from animals or vice versa. Read More >





content.php

Canine Hip Dysplasia

Image Credit: Wikipedia

Canine Hip Dysplasia

Hip dysplasia is a common joint condition of giant and large breed dogs.  A malformation of the ball and socket joint where the thigh bone articulates with the pelvis, hip dysplasia can vary in its severity and symptoms. Hip dysplasia is a progressive condition and treatment options are available at all life stages to minimize pain and optimize quality of life. Read More >





content.php

Paralysis: Dogs in the Woods at High Risk

Image may contain: dog, tree, outdoor and nature

Photo credit: Sara Chisnell

Paralysis: Dogs in the Woods at High Risk

Coonhound paralysis (a.k.a. ‘polyradiculoneuritis’) is a neurologic condition resulting in progressive paralysis.  Any dog is susceptible and those who spend time in the woods or rural areas on a regular basis are at higher risk for acquiring this disorder.  Contact with raccoon saliva through a bite or scratch is associated with development of Coonhound paralysis symptoms, though contact with a racoon is not always reported in affected dogs. Symptoms are associated with an abnormal immune response that affects the nervous system. Read More >





content.php

Intestinal Worms: The Basics

hookworm in dogs

Image Credit: Centers For Disease Control and Prevention/Wikimedia

Intestinal Worms: The Basics

Parasites are like pirates . . . they will commandeer your pet like pirates take over a ship.  You cannot always see parasites but that doesn’t mean they do not exist!

Parasites have evolved to leech nutrition from their host while simultaneously trying to evade detection and death by the host. Intestinal worms are a common health concern for many species, canines included. The most common intestinal worms in dogs are: hookworms, roundworms, whipworms, and tapeworms. Read More >





content.php

Keep an Eye Out for Injury

Keep an eye out for injury

A keen sense of sight is a necessary attribute in sporting dogs. Eye injuries can occur during outdoor training and hunting activities, and dogs with pre-existing eye defects or deformations may be more susceptible. Certain facial anatomy in different breeds of dogs can also contribute or make some dogs more susceptible to injury.
Read More >